I Shall Be Free

Alaine. 20 years old. Trying to find meaning anywhere I can. I love to go on adventures and be weird. Come with and give me a new perspective on life.

The entire universe contributes incessantly to your existence. Hence the entire universe is your body.

—Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj (via lazyyogi)

(via timothybj)

You have to take seriously the notion that understanding the universe is your responsibility, because the only understanding of the universe that will be useful to you is your own understanding.

—Terence McKenna (via lazyyogi)

(via timothybj)

When you know who you are, you don’t look to the world to tell you. Similarly, you don’t fear other people since they cannot take anything from you. Your awareness of yourself as you really are is your liberation.

The Lazy Yogi  (via lazyyogi)

(Source: , via timothybj)

The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love. It may look paradoxical to you, but it’s not. It is an existential truth: only those people who are capable of being alone are capable of love, of sharing, of going into the deepest core of another person—without possessing the other, without becoming dependent on the other, without reducing the other to a thing, and without becoming addicted to the other. They allow the other absolute freedom, because they know that if the other leaves, they will be as happy as they are now. Their happiness cannot be taken by the other, because it is not given by the other.

—Osho (via lazyyogi)

(via timothybj)

The identity attributed to yourself is the prime ingredient in your vision of everything else.

—Master Nome (via lazyyogi)

(via timothybj)

guardian:

As Eva Green’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For poster is pulled over ‘nudity’, we look at other promos that have fallen foul of the censors. See more
Photo: Troublemaker Studios

guardian:

As Eva Green’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For poster is pulled over ‘nudity’, we look at other promos that have fallen foul of the censors. See more

Photo: Troublemaker Studios

(Source: theguardian.com, via timothybj)

ancientart:

Cuneiform tablet with the Atrahasis Epic. Babylonian, about 17th century BC, from Sippar, southern Iraq.
A version of the Flood story

The story outlines the structure of the universe according to Babylonian beliefs. Heaven is ruled by the god Anu, the earth by Enlil and the subterranean sweet water by Enki. The text then explains how the minor gods work in the fields but then rebel. As a result, humans are made from clay, saliva and divine blood to act as servants of the gods.
This does not prove a perfect solution, as the humans reproduce and their noise disturbs Enlil’s sleep. He decides to destroy them with plague, famine, drought and finally a flood. However, each time Enki instructs one of the humans, Atrahasis, to survive the disasters. The god gives Atrahasis seven days warning of the flood, and he builds a boat, loads it with his possessions, animals and birds. He is subsequently saved while the rest of humankind is destroyed. However, the gods are unhappy as they no longer receive the offerings they used to. There is a gap in the text at this point but it does end with Atrahasis making an offering and Enlil accepting the existence and usefulness of humans.
Copies of this story have survived from the seventeenth to the seventh century BC showing that it was copied and re-copied over the centuries. This is the most complete version. There are clear similarities between this Flood story and others known in Mesopotamian literature, for example, the Epic of Gilgamesh. (BM)

Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London, ME 78941. Photo taken by Popolon.

ancientart:

Cuneiform tablet with the Atrahasis Epic. Babylonian, about 17th century BC, from Sippar, southern Iraq.

A version of the Flood story

The story outlines the structure of the universe according to Babylonian beliefs. Heaven is ruled by the god Anu, the earth by Enlil and the subterranean sweet water by Enki. The text then explains how the minor gods work in the fields but then rebel. As a result, humans are made from clay, saliva and divine blood to act as servants of the gods.

This does not prove a perfect solution, as the humans reproduce and their noise disturbs Enlil’s sleep. He decides to destroy them with plague, famine, drought and finally a flood. However, each time Enki instructs one of the humans, Atrahasis, to survive the disasters. The god gives Atrahasis seven days warning of the flood, and he builds a boat, loads it with his possessions, animals and birds. He is subsequently saved while the rest of humankind is destroyed. However, the gods are unhappy as they no longer receive the offerings they used to. There is a gap in the text at this point but it does end with Atrahasis making an offering and Enlil accepting the existence and usefulness of humans.

Copies of this story have survived from the seventeenth to the seventh century BC showing that it was copied and re-copied over the centuries. This is the most complete version. There are clear similarities between this Flood story and others known in Mesopotamian literature, for example, the Epic of Gilgamesh. (BM)

Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London, ME 78941. Photo taken by Popolon.

(via timothybj)